• Interviews

    Matthew Korpman discusses why he wrote Saying No to God, what sets it apart from other book about the Bible, and what he hopes his readers will experience.


    It's the FINAL INSTALLMENT of our series, "Setting the Bible Free" and this week we sit down with theologian and scholar, Matthew Korpman, to talk about his new book (releasing DECEMBER 13, 2019), Saying No To God: A Radical Approach To Reading The Bible Faithfully. In the episode Matthew talks to us about what deconstruction has looked like for him and explains to us how and why the Bible urges us to not only argue with God, but to say NO to God. Special Music: YUNG CITIZEN


    I love debates. Don't you? New ideas, new solutions, common ground. Debates are usually between humans in order to solve human problems. Yet, what happens when the human and the divine have a debate? Can we win? Should we fight? Are we even allowed to questioned what the Divine says and does? Today on Disruptive Adventism, we talk about this topic and more with Matthew Korpman, a theologian finishing his studies at Yale Divinity School. In his new book, Saying No To God, he delves into the topic of the divine human relationship and how we must fight God and get blessings from him.


    Episode 27 features author and theologian Matthew J. Korpman discussing a radical new way of reading the Bible. Matthew is a rising biblical scholar, itinerant preacher, and theological arsonist. Currently pursuing his Master of Arts in Religion at Yale Divinity School, he holds four bachelor degrees in Theology, Archaeology, Philosophy, and Screenwriting. He has traveled and excavated in Israel and Jordan, and is proud to call San Diego, California his home. Whether you agree with all of his conclusions or not, you will gain valuable tools for learning to think critically about the scriptures. Order Matthew's groundbreaking new book Saying No to God on Amazon.


    Matthew J. Korpman is a rising biblical scholar, itinerant preacher, and theological arsonist. Currently pursuing his Master of Arts in Religion at Yale Divinity School, he holds four bachelor degrees in Theology, Archaeology, Philosophy, and Screenwriting. He has traveled and excavated in Israel and Jordan, and is proud to call San Diego, California his home. Matthew has a great academic and theological mind, but also has a love for storytelling. I forced him out of his comfort zone today and he responded admirably. I think you will enjoy his book and it will challenge you to a deeper and more authentic faith.


    We explore the power of nonviolent protest and rules for Christian radicals. Plus, Matthew J. Korpman, author of Saying No to God, is our Heretic of the Week!


    Saying no to God... is that even a thing? Matthew J. Korpman sure thinks so! He joins Josh this week for a conversation about his latest book Saying No To God: A Radical Approach to Reading the Bible Faithfully. Korpman proposes that the Bible itself reveals that just because 'God says it,' does not, in fact, mean 'that settles it.' Instead, a closer reading of scripture shows that God does not want us to just blindly obey him, but rather, invites us to 'lock hands' with him. Could it be that readers are not asked to just accept what God says, but on the contrary: to say no to it? Not because they merely want to, but because the God of the Bible actually requires it.


    Matthew J. Korpman is a rising biblical scholar, itinerant preacher, and theological arsonist. Currently pursuing his Master of Arts in Religion at Yale Divinity School, he holds four bachelor degrees in Theology, Archaeology, Philosophy, and Screenwriting. He has traveled and excavated in Israel and Jordan, and is proud to call San Diego, California his home. With Endorsements from Brian McLaren, Pete Rollins, Brad Jersak, and many others. This young theologian is one to watch!


    It's a Matthew + Matthew team up! The (podcasting) Matthew sits down with the (scholar) Matthew to talk about the latter's research into early Adventism and the apocrypha! (Note, this interview was recorded in the summer of 2019.)


    How can a book called Saying No To God be an expression of a Christian perspective? Because, as Korpman and I discuss in this double-length episode, this is precisely the stance that a number of biblical as well as post-biblical Jewish and Christian stories depict those faithful to God as adopting, and for which they are praised. Listen in and find out more!


    Yale Divinity student, Matthew Korpman, discusses growing up idolizing Adventist evangelists, how La Sierra University challenged him, and the controversial argument in his new book: Saying NO to God: A Radical Approach to Reading the Bible faithfully.


    What would you do if I said that the reason our church struggles to reach the culture so much is because we say “yes” to God too often? And what if the key to missional power actually lies in saying “NO” to Him? Chances are you might think I’ve gone off the deep end. And maybe I have! But you’ll never know until you check out this weeks new podcast episode where I sit down with author Matthew J. Korpman to discuss his new book, Saying No to God: A Radical Approach to Reading the Bible Faithfully. In this interview we dig into the Bible and church history to discover how saying “no” to God is actually one of the most faithful things we can do. We also talk about how our failure to do so is at the root of Christianity’s missional failure both historically and in the contemporary age.


    Listen in as Matthew and I talk about our obligation to sometimes say NO to God.


    Is there ever a time to say NO to God? Does God always demand a yes? Would God knowingly go against His own character? Throughout the bible, we find instances of people calling God out for seemingly going against His own character. From asking for child sacrifices to threatening the slaughter of His own chosen people, God has on more than one occasion came across as not so loving or merciful? But what if that was all a test? What if God wanted to see if we knew who He really was? This week, we are talking with Matthew Korpman, Author of “Saying No to God”. Matthew’s work does a fantastic job of bridging the gap between both liberal and conservative-minded individuals to come together within the confines of Biblical inerrancy and scripture. Matthew shows us that there is, in fact, a time to say no to God.


  • Sermons

    Why do the greatest heroes of faith in the Bible argue with God... and win?


    Does the Bible promote slavery? What did we do about it?


    Many think that Jesus calls us in his famous parable to be like the Good Samaritan. But what if he didn't? What if he didn't even expect us to believe his message at all?


    Exploring briefly why context matters when studying Scripture. Excerpts taken from larger sermon.


    Sermon given March 18, 2017


  • Reviews

    When was the last time you said “no” to God? Is even the thought of that question preposterous to you? Or am I a heretic for even asking? Rarely do I turn the last page of a book and immediately start planning for my next read through. This was my experience after finishing Matthew Korpman’s debut book, Saying No to God: A Radical Approach to Reading the Bible Faithfully. This is the first book…


    Matthew J. Korpman’s latest book—Saying No to God: A Radical Approach to Reading the Bible Faithfully—is a compelling and stunning dance between the axiomatic and the uncomfortable. On the one hand, much of what is in the book is so self-evident that it’s difficult to imagine a book is even needed to express it. On the other hand, the obvious things of life are often the first to lose their apparency. Perhaps this…


    In his book Saying No to God: A Radical Approach to Reading the Bible Faithfully (2019, Quoir), author Matthew Korpman does something new when he gives book-length attention to the assertion that saying “No” to God is an example of faithful discipleship. Biblical inerrancy, whether formally adopted or not, twists traditional religion’s description of discipleship into something different from what the Bible, as a whole, conveys…